Adversity: Empowering Kids to Rise to the Challenge

Adversity: Empowering Kids to Rise to the ChallengeLately adversity hammered the world in many directions: natural disasters of biblical scale, political confrontations that resulted in death and, most recently a madman mowed down more than five hundred innocent people. At some level, it feels like our world verges on the brink of collapse. Children hear and observe what occurs around them. They watch TV and absorb the horrific reports. As adults we bear a huge responsibility to help them frame and understand the facts. We must share age-appropriate information and provide them tools to process and live with the challenging realities all around us. More importantly, we must help them regain a feeling of security and peace.

Provide kids tools to process the challenging realities & help them regain a feeling of… Click To Tweet

We best cope with feelings of overwhelm when we engage in action. Today’s book offers one tool that can help kids access that feeling of self-empowerment. V. Radunsky in collaboration with hundreds of children whom he interviewed  from all over the planet and asked them this seminal question: What Does Peace Feel Like?  Radunsky arranged their responses by senses: sight, sound, taste, touch and, smell. He illustrated the text with child-like drawings in rich, intense colors and simple shapes. The children’s words drive this book.

Parents and teachers can ask their children (students,) for their own ideas which can be made into a personalized book. Working in a group helps children notice the commonalities which all human beings share in addition to the unique perspective which each person takes on these common experiences and emotions. The more that we see one another as “like” ourselves, the less apt we are to view them as “other.” This tends to increase empathy, tolerance and, inclusivity–all of which are good. Unless we choose to live together in harmony, the future is bleak. We must hold difficult conversations, explore complex issues & commit to a solution with which… Click To Tweet

Children and the Fight for Social JusticeAdoption-attuned* Lens This story can offer another pathways to exploring the role of “othering” and how it shapes relationships. People can separate themselves  along many criteria, for example, nationality, religion, and politics. For children, family tends to be the main focus of their “world.” Thus distinctions about family can divide them into separate groups: divorced or intact, bio or adopted, step- or full, one parent or two, etc. Open conversations that can help kids see that these distinctions need not be used to isolate or create a sense of hierarchy in which one type of family is seen as “better” than the other.

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Our theme for this #DiverseKidLit is #ownvoices. The #ownvoices hashtag was created to draw attention to diverse authors and illustrators who are creating books that honor their own heritage and experiences. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community serves as a resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, November 4th and the first Saturday of each month.

Upcoming Theme

Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. Do you have a suggestion for a future theme? Share your ideas with us at katie at thelogonauts dot com.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit was Myra’s linkup post about Remembering Auschwitz through a picture book and a graphic novel. This post shares two powerful resources about the Holocaust in general, and Auschwitz specifically, as well as links to other sources. Thank you for sharing, Myra.

Welcome, Bethany!

#diversekidlit is excited to welcome new host, Bethany, of Biracial Bookworms. Bethany is an educator, blogger, world traveler, wife, and mom to two wonderful girls who inspired her web site. You can read more about her and her family here. We are thrilled to have Bethany joining our community as a host and advocate! Please follow here online: Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram / Goodreads.

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Gauri @ Kitaab World
an online bookstore for South Asian children’s books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagram
Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+
Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

Our Pinterest board highlights a wide range of amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

Share Your Link Below

Children and the Fight for Social Justice

Children-and-the-Fight-for-Social-JusticeThe Youngest Marcher by Cynthia Levinson and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton introduces the remarkable story of how children helped amplify the tide of the civil rights movement. This book is sure to impress young readers with an understanding that even children can stand up for what is right. Kids can work for social justice in ways both large and public as well as small and personal.

 

Kids can work for social justice in ways both large and public as well as small and personal. Click To Tweet

The social justice movement dominates the news lately. Kids certainly hear the reports and discussions. Some children may feel fearful and powerless. Others may yearn to make a difference, to participate in the solution-making process. Most will probably assume that they can’t do anything because they’re young. This push and pull between the call to action and feeling constrained will frustrate and distress them.

But Audrey’s story shows them that their assumption is false. Children can do something to effect change and to shine a light into the dark corners of society. The courage and righteous indignation of children can often awaken reluctant adults to take action. In a case like the Birmingham Children’s March, children acted when the potential cost to families–job loss, eviction, beatings– prevented adults from acting.

The courage and righteous indignation of children can often awaken reluctant adults to take action. Click To Tweet

Newton’s illustrations and Levinson’s text depict the privations and insults of segregation in powerful and revealing ways: the dirty fountains, the humiliating trek to the back of the bus, being relegated to the freight elevator instead of the passenger elevator used by whites, etc. Kids will feel Audrey’s humiliations and understand her reactions.

Audrey embodies the earnestness, purity of heart and trust of a child raised with faith, love and, respect.  She listens to the words of the famous civil rights leaders who dine at her family’s table. They share food, friendship and, a mission. Audrey takes their words to to heart. In spite of her fear, she takes action and responds with courage.

The story depicts  Audrey’s jail experience effectively yet without overly frightening young readers. The sense of loneliness, hunger, privation come across. One illustration which spreads across two pages, depicts the first time Audrey speaks to a white man. A group of them tower over her and spew questions: “Are you against America? … Why do you march?”

Audrey’s honest response: “To go places and do things like everybody else.” Young readers will understand Audrey’s stance. Kids believe in fairness; they lobby for it regularly. Their protestations start at home where they want to ensure that they and their siblings get equal treatment (and yes, the same “stuff” too.) Eventually, they expand their horizons to include friends, classmates, etc.

Most kids would be horrified at the thought of risking jail but they can understand less shocking and dramatic ways to stand up for right like standing up to the class bully or befriending the new student in class. The Youngest Marcher can open many important conversations about civil rights, respect and equality. Click To Tweet

Children and the Fight for Social JusticeAdoption-attuned* Lens This story can offer an easy way to introduce discussions about fundamental equality and universal rights. Most adoptees encounter instances where people imply that their family isn’t quite as “real”  as families exclusively built through adoption. Trans-racially and trans-culturally adopted children may feel a particular resonance with the struggle for equality.

The Climb to the Top

Sky Dancers-the-climb-to-the-top-climb-fear-skill-familyI loved climbing trees as a child, that exhilarating, terrifying race to the top. I can still remember the thrill of reaching hand over hand until I found myself high in the canopy of leaves. The world appeared smaller, less intimidating. Hidden from sight, ensconced in a private world, my imagination soared. To this day heights both fascinate and intimidate me.

So, when I came across Sky Dancers written by Connie Ann Kirk and illustrated by Christy Hale, I was particularly intrigued. It tells the story of a young Native American boy’s family tradition as steel workers on some of New York’s largest, tallest and most famous constructions. It is a fictional piece based on history.  The boy’s family represents many Mohawk tribe members who actually worked the high steel in the early years of the twentieth century.

The story opens with John Cloud trying to talk himself into climbing a tree beyond where his fear holds him in place. He thinks about his dad, who at that very moment was walking the girders of a Manhattan sky scraper building it higher and higher into the sky.  John replays memories of his grandfather‘s tales of his own time as a sky walker.

The boy wonders if he’ll ever be as brave and strong as his dad and grandfather. He also wonders if his grandfather will ever fulfill his promise to bring him into the city and actually see his dad on the job. When that day finally comes, John is overawed with pride.

This is a sweet story of inter-generational links that bond families together. Click To Tweet It offers a welcome window onto an ethnic group that tends to be under served in children’s literature. The story is a refreshing break from the typical themes we see associated with Native Americans: riding horses, hunting, etc. And, it is not an “issues” book. On the contrary, it depicts these Americans as normal families who do the typical things all families do: love on another, share family stories, go to work, etc.

AQ #AdoptionAttunementSky-Dancers-the-climb-to-the-top-climb-fear-skill-family Adoption-attuned Lens:  This story easily lends itself to discussions of generational family patterns which could include both those of the birth and adoptive families. Each has value, attraction and contributes to making the child who he is and who he will choose to become.

Sky Dancers prods us to ponder the way we overcome our fears, grow our skills and develop mastery. One of the cultural memes about the Native Americans historical role in the high steel construction industry attributes their skill to their having a special aptitude. Some people feel that categorizing their bravery and skill as an unearned “gift” that comes to them effortlessly diminishes the personal fortitude and persistence it takes to overcome instinctive fear and perform in dangerous conditions. Sky Dancers offers an easy path to discussions about talent, perseverance and achievement and how each contributes to one’s success.

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community serves as a resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, October 7th and the first Saturday of each month.

Upcoming Theme

Our theme for October (7th) will be #ownvoices. The #ownvoices hashtag was created to draw attention to diverse authors and illustrators who are creating books that honor their own heritage and experiences. Please share your favorite titles or authors / illustrators with us!

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit was one I am sure we all could use: 19 Multicultural Children’s Books teaching Kindness & Empathy. This fabulous collection of picture books covers a wide range of cultures and topics including issues around immigration, acceptance, jealousy, and more. Thanks for sharing, Svenja!

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Becky @ Franticmommmy
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Carolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Gauri @ Kitaab World
an online bookstore for South Asian children’s books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagram

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Jane @ Rain City Librarian
Blog / Twitter / Instagram

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

Our Pinterest board highlights a wide range of amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

Share Your Link 

Relationships Comfort across Time and Space

relationships-comfort-across--time-spaceThe transition of summer into autumn marks a twist of time that is familiar to all of us, young and old, student and graduate, parent and child. School bells ring across the country, marking the end of summer. Once again, children will leave their homes for the hubbub of school.

This separation excites some children. They race to rejoin friends whom they haven’t seen all summer. Other children, especially in the younger grades, feel angst, loneliness and, fear.

Change by its very nature, upends the status quo. It demands that we throw off the comfort of the familiar and, step through the open door into the possibility of “next.” Both scary and exciting, change is the gateway.

Emotions run high and we yearn to have witnesses to the events—whether it is to celebrate, encourage or, comfort. Joy shared is joy multiplied. Fear shared is fear halved. Sun Kisses, Moon Hugs offers an engaging metaphor that can reassure little ones that the connections that tie us to the people we love endures across distances of time and space. That they can be invisible witnesses to their lives. Whether their separation concerns focus on parents who are at the office, on the road, across the world—whatever the reason—their presence is constant. Sun Kisses, Moon Hugs shows how that affection can be seen and felt in myriad ways, rain or shine, night or day.

Reassure children that connections to people they love endures across distances of time & space. Click To Tweet

Author Susan Schaefer Bernardo and Illustrator Courtenay Fletcher have created a charming book that will uplift and reassure children. Adults who read the book will find a lovely way of describing the powerful emotions that connect them to the people in their lives. (It’s not just kids who experience the pangs of separation, adults do also.)

 Adoption-attuned Lens:  This story might easily trigger a conversation about the connection, longing and questions about birth parents that adoptees have. They may find reassurance in imagining these important people being present in the constants of sun- and moon-shine, raindrops and snowflakes, butterflies and rainbows, storms or changing seasons.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Kisses-Moon-Susan-Schaefer-Bernardo/dp/0971122814/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1503846427&sr=1-1&keywords=Sun+Kisses%2C+Moon+hugs

Wardrobe Choices: An Annual Back to School Challenge

Wardrobe Choices: An Annual Back to School Challenge Suki's KimonoSuki’s Kimono by Chieri Uegaki and illustrated by Stephanie Jorisch makes a perfect choice for reader’s who will soon be returning to school. As first-grader Suki selects her clothes for the first day of school, the spunky heroine of the story makes a dramatic decision.”  Rather than choose a predictable outfit as her older sisters suggest, she decides to wear a beautiful kimono. She ignores their predictions that kids will laugh at her. More importantly, her outfit reminds her of the wonderful day her  obachan (grandmother) gave it to her. Young readers will identify with her desire to “dress up” at school. While parents will chuckle as they consider times when they resisted a child’s wish to wear a tutu, cowboy outfit or, superhero cape to school.

Suki’s two sisters advise her to change her wardrobe choices and to opt for “something cool.”  But, Suki feels beautiful in the traditional garb and remains undeterred.  Confident about her decision, she follows her sisters out the door. The older girls race ahead and pretend they don’t know their dramatically dressed sister who clatters behind them in her red geta (clogs).  The breeze flutters Suki’s voluminous sleeves like butterfly wings. Memories of her special day with her obachan warm Suki’s heart. She doesn’t mind looking unusual; she revels in it!

Of course, once she gets to school, the other children quickly judge her outfit. Some simply note that it is unusual. Others take a far less tolerant stand. Suki remains confident which is a great piece of modeling for young readers. She doesn’t allow the other kids’ assessments to spoil her feelings about her choice. Click To TweetWhen it is her turn to share  a summer memory with her class, she amuses them with the tale of her special day with her obachan: the street festival, the dancing, the traditional foods and the booming thud of the taiko (drums.) Lost in her precious memory, Suki dances  for them. Her confidence and joy win over her classmates.

At the end of the day the sisters meet for their walk home. The two older girls trudge home and complain that no one noticed their “cool” clothes. In opting to conform, the girls got lost in a sea of sameness. Suki on the other hand, buoyed by her day, “danced all the way home.”

AQ #AdoptionAttunement Wardrobe Choices: An Annual Back to School Challenge Suki's Kimono Adoption-attuned LensThis sweet story offers several paths for discussion. First, to stand up for oneself and “own” one’s choices. By doing this, Suki created a successful day for herself and built on the treasured memory of her day with her grandmother. She did not allow others to spoil it for her. This is a life-lesson which most of us struggle to master. For adoptees, especially those who do not share their adoptive family’s culture or race, Suki’s enthusiasm for her cultural roots is refreshing and inspiring.

Second, Suki resists the temptation to follow the crowd and wear something predictable and acceptable to the group. She takes an important step in thinking for herself. She makes her own decisions and does not allow the crowd to choose for her. This is another essential life skill. The proverbial parental admonition comes to mind: Would you jump off a cliff just because everyone else was doing it? For adoptees who often wrestle with a visceral need to fit in, Suki offers a charming role model. Click To TweetStanding up for oneself can be scary and powerful.

Our theme for this #DiverseKidLit is socioeconomic diversity. Kids from all economic brackets should be able to find themselves in books – as well as to learn about the lives of others in different economic situations. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community serves as a resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, September 2nd and the first and third Saturdays of each month.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit was What is Family? 18 Picture Books about Loving Families in All Forms from Barefoot Mommy. This post includes new books as well as old favorites including multigenerational, multiracial, LGBTQ, foster, adoptive, and divorced families.

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Katie @ The Logonauts
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestBecky @ Franticmommmy
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / InstagramCarolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+Gauri @ Kitaab World
an online bookstore for South Asian children’s books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagramGayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+Jane @ Rain City Librarian
Blog / Twitter / InstagramMarjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

Our Pinterest board highlights a wide range of amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

Share Your Link Below


https://goo.gl/UVeO9L

Marisol McDonald Series Celebrates Being Unique

Marisol McDonald-quirky-diversity-Series that celebrates Being-UniqueMarisol rhymes with parasol which conjures images of brilliant sunshine. Marisol McDonald, the charming heroine of this series delivers a similar warm and sunny lift. She delights in her quixotic and colorful approach to life. She exudes confidence which provides her an umbrella of security to carry her through her days. The series, written in both English and Spanish by Monica Brown and illustrated by Sara Palacios highlights the adventures of Marisol. She has a rich ethnic ancestry (Peruvian-Scottish-American) and a penchant for quirkiness which makes for an interesting, colorful and, fun perspective. Most of us–whether we’re a child or an adult–admire spunk and the ability to be comfy in our own skin. Still, the struggle to find acceptance and to fit in is real, especially for kids. A spunky, self-assured character like Marisol delights and serves as a model for what is possible. Click To Tweet Confident people attract our attention. We want to be with them and be like them. Marisol is quirky diversity personified!

Marisol-McDonald-celebrates-Being-Unique-confidence-security-quirky-diversity-marisol-mcdonald-and-the-monster-51bcmtoy6vl-_sx437_bo1204203200_The third, and newest book in the series is,  Marisol McDonald and the Monster , debuted in July 2016 and finds Marisol  confronting a nightly visit by a monster under her bed!

Because most kids have had a similar experience at least once, young readers will easily identify with her situation. Marisol tries to be brave and to dismiss the nightly encounter as a figment of her imagination but… try as she might, the monster continues to bother her. In typical Marisol fashion, she takes action.

She fashions a monster of her own, one that is real and–since she created it herself, it is not scary at all. Except her efforts prove unsuccessful. The monster and its nightly bump, bump, bump persists. Marisol is determined not to let the monster win. To learn how Marisol defeats the him get yourself a copy!*

Marisol-McDonald-celebrates-Being-Unique-confidence-security-quirky-diversity--marisol-mcdonald-doesnt-match-510a77mjrpl-_sx421_bo1204203200_Sara Palacios won a Pura Belpré Illustrator Award Honor for her drawings in Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match the first book in the series. Her energetic illustrations brings Marisol’s quirky approach to life in a way that enchants readers and showcases the beauty of “not matching.” Whether it is her physical characteristics (carrot-colored hair and brown skin,) her kooky fashion choices or, unusual food concoctions, Marisol’s unique approach is appealing. Even her dog doesn’t “match.” He’s got one brown eye and one blue eye and a most unusual name: Kitty!

Even Marisol is tempted by the desire to blend in. She briefly attempts conformity. Everyone misses the bright spark that Marisol usually contributes and all are relieved when the real Marisol returns. This story provides a wonderful model for kids who all too often surrender themselves to a… Click To Tweet

Marisol-McDonald-celebrates-Being-Unique-confidence-security-quirky-diversity--marisol-mcdonald-and-the-clash-bash-514-yahfjal-_sx421_bo1204203200_

Marisol McDonald and the Clash Bash is the second collaboration between Monica Brown and Sara Palacios. The two previous books revealed that Marisol is one self-assured and unique young lady. It’s no surprise then, that when it comes to celebrating her birthday, the event is far from ordinary. Only one “theme” suits Marisol: a “clash bash!” Her party is a melange of ideas and her guests’ costumes embody variety and personality. Creativity reigns and all have wonderful fun. Inspired by Marisol’s quirky “mix and match” approach, they “borrow” parts of one another’s outfits freely without worrying if it should be for only a boy or girl. There’s no jeering, judging or snubbing as they celebrate. They’re just having fun, fun, fun!

The story includes a wonderful use of contemporary technology which helps Marisol celebrate her birthday with her Peruvian Abuelita.

magnifying-lens-AQ.2-161x300 Adoption-attuned Lens: Throughout the illustrations in all three books there are elements of Marisol’s rich ethnic heritage: llamas, chullos (the traditional knit hat,) Peruvian textiles. All blend in a colorful and rich celebration of cultural diversity. Highlighting these signposts of culture can easily lead to conversations about the ways an adoptive family honors all the different aspects of culture of the family–birth and adoptive. Marisol clearly values all aspects of her racially diverse family, her multi-ethnic heritage, and her two languages! Often, adoptive families don’t “match.” This series raises the topic in a non-threatening way, making it approachable and easy to address.

These stories can also open dialog about the urge to fit in and conform, what it costs and how to cope. Since the need to be comfortable with self and to fit in is often complicated for adoptees, these stories can offer a non-threatening pathway for discussions. They can look through the third person perspective of Marisol and or the first person of the reader–if they’re receptive to that direct approach.

*I received a review copy of Marisol and the Monster from the publisher in exchange for an unbiased review. The opinions stated are my own. I purchased the other two books included in this review.

Our theme for this #DiverseKidLit is books in a series. Series books are great for hooking readers, because there’s another book after you finish the first one! Share your favorite book series featuring diverse characters. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

DiverseKidLitWhat Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

 We hope this community serves as a resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Sat., August 5th. We will host one linkup per month (on the first Saturday) for the summer months.

Our theme for the current month is books in a series. Series books are great for hooking readers, because there’s another book after you finish the first one! Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. If you’re interested, you can start planning now …

Upcoming Theme  Our theme for August (5th) will be socioeconomic diversity. What are your favorite books for honoring characters and families who come from somewhere other than the 1% or even the upper/middle classes? We look forward to seeing your choices!

Most Clicked Post from Last Time: was this incredible resource from Colours to Us: 50 Picture Books about Mixed-Race Families. Wow!

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Katie @ The Logonauts   Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestBecky @ Franticmommmy   Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Carolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault   Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Gauri @ Kitaab World
an online bookstore for South Asian children’s books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagram

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me   Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Jane @ Rain City Librarian   Blog / Twitter / Instagram

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors   Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom   Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books   Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries   Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live. Click here to join the mailing list.

Interested in joining as host or occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

Our Pinterest board highlights amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Consider following the board for even more great books!

Share Your Link Below

 

Every Family is Unique

Stella Brings the Familyhttps://www.amazon.com/Stella-Brings-Family-Miriam-Schiffer/dp/1452111901/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1496321058&sr=1-1&keywords=stella+brings+the+family

Stella Brings the Family written by Miriam B. Schiffer and illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown features a little girl facing a dilemma: she has no mommy to bring to the school  Mother’s Day celebration.  Stella has two fathers but no mommy. When her classmates notice that Stella is feeling down, they ask her. “What is wrong?” Stella shares her problem. Her classmates respond with many questions that focus on who fulfills the traditional “mothering” tasks for her. Stella tells them how  her parents nurture her showing that it is not who does the loving that is important. It’s that someone is there to love the child wholeheartedly.

Stella’s classmates see beyond her perception of the problem and they ask since her dads are supporting her like a mother, why not have them come to the festivities? Heck, you could even bring her aunt, uncle and cousin who are also an important part of Stella’s family. Stella embraces their suggestion.

On the day of the school celebration the families arrive. Readers will discover that there are many kinds of families within the small group: single parents, grandparent-parents, two moms and two dads. The families are depicted without a lot of fanfare. Their variety and differences is not the point, the way families support one another is.

One of the subtle plot lines of the story is the empathy and sensitivity which Stella’s classmates demonstrate. They are so in tune with her that they are able to notice she is distressed. They not only notice, they take action and ask her about it. This models important EQ (emotional Intelligence) skills and offer another important discussion thread when reading this book.

small magnifier AQ* Lens

Stella Brings the Family  offers an obvious path to discussing adoption because Stella has two dads. She most likely has been adopted by one or both of her dads. Similarly, one of the other families depicted features two moms who also happen to be racially diverse. It is certainly possible to wonder about some of the other children as well. Simply because they look like they “match” does not rue out the possibility that they might have been adopted. When we look at a child, you can’t identify if they were adopted; there’s not tattoo or brand that marks them visibly. This thought can be expanded into discussions about assumptions–on the appropriate level– and how our guesses (assumptions) about situations can be way off the mark. It’s important to teach children this concept early and to reinforce it often.

 

 Our theme for this #DiverseKidLit is books featuring multiethnic families and/or biracial main characters. Sometimes a focus on diversity can feel like forcing people into boxes. Let’s celebrate the diversity that can be found within a single person or household! (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community serves as a resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, July 1st. We will only be hosting one linkup per month (on the first Saturday) for June, July, and August.

Upcoming Theme

Our theme for the current month is books featuring biracial and/or multi-ethnic characters. Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. If you’re interested, you can start planning now …  Our theme for July (1st) will be series. Series books are great for hooking readers, because there’s another book after you finish the first one! Share your favorite book series featuring diverse characters?

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit was Raincity Librarian’s #diversekidlit and roundup of great picture books about India. Learn about the monsoon, traditional transportation, saris, and more!

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Gauri @ Kitaab World an online bookstore for South Asian children’s books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagram
Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+
Mia @ Pragmatic Mom   Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram 
Myra @ Gathering Books   Blog / Twitter / Facebook 
Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries   Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list.

Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

Our Pinterest board highlights a wide range of amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

Share Your Link      

Haiku Captures Humor and Heartache, Family and Security

Dogku.51Cr+rMZcsL._AC_US218_

Haiku Captures Humor and Heartache, Family and Security

I’m a fan of haiku a traditional form of Japanese poetry. Its compact format distills thoughts to their essence and focuses our lens with unique precision. Sounds stiff and confining. Actually, haiku need not be aloof and formal as these three titles demonstrate.

Dogku by Andrew Clements and illustrated by Tim Bowers is “a tale in haiku of one adorable dog…” who happens to need a home. With the spare framework of haiku, Clements narrates a story of this dog’s journey to a home and family. The emotional truth resonates while the charming oil illustrations reinforce the mood as this less-than-perfectly-behaved pup wriggles his way into the hearts of readers. Readers will root for this charming “Mooch” and will identify with the children who yearn to keep their new pet.

AQ* Lens This story offers and easy digression to explore what it is like to join a new family, to learn the rules and routines and to grow together. Some children may be unsettled by the hint that the dog’s behavior might lead to his return to the pound. The flip side of this risk is that it offers a chance to discuss similar unspoken fears which a child might harbor about himself.

Wing Nuts: Screwy HaikuHaiku Captures Humor and Heartache, Family and Security by Paul B. Janeczko and J. Patrick Lewis. Illustrated by Tricia Tusa oozes humor from every syllable. These short poems will make kids think twice in order to “get” the joke. Consider this example from the poem featured on the cover:

“On Ferris wheel

I regret French fries, milk shake—

those below agree.”

 

I’ll just bet they do!

Zany illustrations capture the humor of each poem which is part riddle, part commentary and all fun. This is a definite winner which will easily rebut any reader’s insistence that they hate poetry.

AQ* Lens In an unexpected twist, several of the families depicted are multiracial. This feature offers a chance to discuss the definition of family and how they need not share a common “look” or race in order to be a genuine family.

Won Ton: A Cat Tale Told in HaikuHaiku Captures Humor and Heartache, Family and Security.Won Ton. Cat tale told in haiku.1M+zz156vL._SX337_BO1,204,203,200_ by Lee Wardlaw and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin tells the story of a cat currently residing at the Shelter. But all is not as it should be. Even though

“Nice place they got here.

Bed. Bowl. Blankie. Just like home.

Or so I’ve been told.”

In seventeen syllables, the reader feels the truth of the cat’s circumstances: although his basic needs are being met, it isn’t equal to the comfort and welcome of home. Each poem reveals part of the cat’s process of learning to feel at home with his new family. The brevity of the haiku does not limit the emotional scope; it distills it down to its essence. This story is endearing and thought provoking

AQ* Lens As in Dogku, there are obvious parallels to the process of joining a family through adoption. Kids adopted at an older age will often hold back their hearts and will be reluctant to be open to new attachments until they are absolutely sure that these new relationships will be safe. In the interim they might choose to resist the welcoming overtures of their new family and can display distancing or negative behavior. We see this reflected in this haiku from Wonton:

“Here, kitty, kitty. Kitty.”

Ha. I’ll stay put till I know”

Are they friend … or foe?

This poem offers an indirect way of talking about the role that caution and with holding can be used as a defense against disappointment of being hurt. Conversations can focus on finding more effective ways to keep oneself safe while still opening up to the possibility that safe and loving relationships are possible.

Our theme for this #DiverseKidLit is Global Books. Please share your favorite diverse books that take place in countries other than your own. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community serves as a resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, June 3rd. We will only be hosting one linkup per month (on the first Saturday) for June, July, and August.

Upcoming Theme

Our theme for the current month is global books. Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. If you’re interested, you can start planning now …

  • Our theme for June (3rd) will be books featuring multiethnic families and/or biracial main characters. Sometimes a focus on diversity can feel like forcing people into boxes. Let’s celebrate the diversity that can be found within a single person or household!
  • Our theme for July (1st) will be series. Series books are great for hooking readers, because there’s another book after you finish the first one! Share your favorite book series featuring diverse characters?

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit was Books for Teaching about Russia from Our Unschooling Journey through Life. This post includes links to 9 different books about Russia as well as an overview of some learning games to play with kids.

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by: 

Katie @ The Logonauts  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Gauri @ Kitaab World   an online bookstore for South Asian children’s books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagram
Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+
Myra @ Gathering Books  Blog / Twitter / Facebook
Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries  Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

Our Pinterest board highlights a wide range of amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!


Get Dirty and Have Fun

Get Dirty and Have Fun.I'm-Dirty

This post will review two fun stories that will tempt kids to turn off their electronic devices, go outside, get dirty and have fun. I’m Dirty by Kate and Jim McMullan features a cocky and energetic backhoe–aptly named “Dirty”– who’s as proud as he is hard-working. He streaks from task to task performing his tasks with pride and skill.  In a single busy day he handles “10 torn up tires … 9 fractured fans … 8 busted beach umbrellas .. ” Young readers will enjoy this counting sequence, laughing and learning as they listen.

One page spread depicts the crushing machine pulverizing the trash. “Dirty” wryly  comments, “Hope ya like noise.” We all know the answer to that rhetorical question! Kids will howl with delight as they join in to speak the sounds. Humor will engage their attention. The story also carries an important message of the importance of hard work and persistence. It is a bonus  to get dirty and have fun in the process.

 

The authors have collaborated on a series of books that feature vehicles as characters. Here are a few. Check them out too.

Get Dirty and Have Fun.Mud + splash = splatter.I'm Brave.61V9Qr1V4ML._AC_UL160_SR160,160_ Get Dirty and Have fun.Mud + splash = splatter.I'm fast.51oIF9QijNL._AC_US218_Get Dirty and Have Fun.Mud + splash = splatter.I'm Mighty.5182AC0QRAL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_

 

 

 

 

 

Get Dirty and Have Fun.Dirt + Water= Mud.51VOVEm80OL._SX462_BO1,204,203,200_Dirt + Water = Mud by Katherine Hannigan introduces us to a unique and un-named girl One look at the cover and readers will suspect that she’s not one of the “usual suspects.” Although she sports a pink tutu, she’s covered in mud–and giggling about it! Clearly, she’s not your typical princess-loving, pink-obsessed girl. He’s discovered how much fun it is to get dirty and have fun! Readers discover that her muddied state happened by choice, after a careful countdown! Her constant companion is a patient and devoted little dog who sometimes gets less than the girl’s best attention. They work out their ups and downs and the story ends with the two friends happily planning the next day’s adventures.

Like the previous title, math also appears throughout this story. Equations appear throughout the story.  (The title itself is an equation.) Sounds dull, but it’s not. It’s zany, silly and fun, e.g., “Mud + splash = splatter … Hose + High up = shower …” The girl’s imagination rockets off to many places. While she enjoys her fantasies, she recognizes that her finest treasure is her dog.

magnifying-lens-AQ.2-161x300AQ Lens: Most adoptees report having a rich fantasy life around the “what Ifs” of their lives (What if a different family had adopted me? What if I’d never been adopted? What if my birth mother is famous…” A book like this which emphasizes the girl’s imaginary worlds offers an easy pathway for discussing the types of fantasies your child might have. Whether they mention adoption or not, the conversation is sure to be fascinating and enlightening.

Welcome to #DiverseKidLit! Please scroll down to share a favorite  #diversekidlit post or to find amazing diverse resources.

What Is #DiverseKidLit?

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit
We hope this community will grow into a great resource for 
parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! 
Our next linkup will be Saturday, May 20th and on 
the first and third Saturdays of every month.

Upcoming Themes

Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. Out of respect for everyone’s increased summer busyness, we will only have one hop each month for June (3rd), July (1st), and August (5th). We will return to twice-monthly hops in September. If you’re interested, you can start planning now …

  • Our next hop will take place on May 20th, and the optional theme will be socioeconomic diversity. Consider sharing some of your favorite books that feature characters across a range of socioeconomic situations.
  • Our theme for the June hop will be global books. Please share your favorite diverse books that take place in countries other than your own. Let’s travel the world this summer!

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit was Patricia’s review of the new book, Where Will I Live? by Rosemary McCarney. This timely picture book includes photographs from the UN High Commission for Refugees and proceeds from the book will help support programs for refugees.

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Katie @ The Logonauts  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestBecky @ Franticmommmy  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Carolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Gauri @ Kitaab World  an online bookstore for South Asian children’s books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagram

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Jane @ Rain City Librarian  Blog / Twitter / Instagram

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom  Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books  Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries  Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

Our Pinterest board highlights a wide range of amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

Share Your Link Below

Let the Party—and the Learning Begin!

Let the party—and the Learning Begin!.Let's Celebrate HoliChildren love festivals and celebrations–don’t we all!

What better way to expand cultural literacy than through learning about unique holidays marked by other cultures. Let’s Celebrate Holi, India’s Festival of Colors by Ajanta [Chakraborty] and Vivek [Kumar] brings to live a delightful holiday celebrated throughout India. The traditional observances vary throughout the country but all include bonfires and drenching one another in vividly colored water. Let the Party—and the Learning Begin! Celebrate Holi. This charming book will teach you how.

Kids will delight in discovering a holiday that provides the perfect excuse for drenching themselves and others in brilliant color, hurling buckets of water, exuberant dancing and, watching bonfires. While these elements will certainly grab their attention, children will simultaneously absorb information about the story behind the festivities. This knowledge will help build a foundation of awareness of and respect for, the traditions and beliefs from other cultures. This is a delightful and engaging book which help awaken interest in other cultures and will broaden their cultural awareness.

Let the Party—and the Learning Begin!.holi.3In this book (the third in the series) Maya and her brother Neel visit relatives in India. Their arrival coincides with the festival of Holi which provides the perfect opportunity for the cousins to explain the holiday. As Maya and Neel learn about their heritage and the various ways the people celebrate throughout the many regions of India, readers will also. They will discover that India is an immense country with many states, each of which observes the holiday in unique ways. The book also includes a pronunciation guide which demonstrates the proper ways to speak the Indian words.

The authors of the series also maintain a website which features additional resources, Bollygroove dance classes, etc. Check it out.

magnifying-lens-AQ.2-161x300

AQ Lens: An appreciation for one’s cultural heritage is probably the most obvious Adoption-attuned opportunity which Let’s Celebrate Holi, India’s Festival of Colors provides. Because of the inherent elements of fun, color, dancing and water play most kids will find the story appealing. It may even make it easier for adoptees to share their culture with others–and feel safe about that sharing.

Be sure to read the other books in the series:

Let's Celebrate Diwali.Holi.Let the Party—and the Learning Begin!

 

Let’s Celebrate Five Days of Diwali 

and

 

Let's Visit Mumbai.Let the Party—and the Learning Begin!.61aW9I8-2vL._SX384_BO1,204,203,200_

 

Let’s Visit Mumbai